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Student Services

We’re here for you. Penn Nursing’s Student Services is dedicated to helping students achieve their academic and professional goals in a supportive, holistic environment.

Christina M. Costanzo, EdD Assistant Dean for Admissions & Academic AffairsChristina M. Costanzo, EdD
Assistant Dean for Admissions & Academic Affairs
Welcome to the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing! 

Our staff is here to orient you and provide a smooth transition to Penn Nursing and the University, facilitate your course registration and clinical compliance, help advise you on academic options to include in your plan of study, introduce you to student life within the school and on the Penn campus, refer you to support services and resources, and celebrate your accomplishments with you at graduation.

We invite you to visit us in Suite M-18 of Claire Fagin Hall and learn more about our services.
You can reach us at 215-898-6687 or advisor@nursing.upenn.edu.

We look forward to meeting you in person!

Christina M. Costanzo, EdD
Assistant Dean for Admissions and Academic Affairs
costanzo@nursing.upenn.edu

  • Science Advisory: Advocating for Developmental Care for Infants With Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    Developmental disorders, disabilities, and delays are common outcomes for infants with complex congenital heart disease. Targeting early factors influencing these conditions after birth and during neonatal hospitalization for cardiac surgery remains a critical need. However, significant gaps remain in understanding the best practices to improve neurodevelopmental and psychosocial outcomes for these infants.

  • Study Shows Missed Nursing Care is a Key Factor in Adverse Outcomes for Very Low Birthweight Infants

    Sometimes hospital staff nurses cannot provide required care due to time constraints. This reality can contribute to potentially dire outcomes for very low birthweight (VLBW) infants, who weigh less than 3.3 lbs. at birth. These newborns depend on the nurse for survival. Missed nursing care is likely clinically relevant to whether VLBW infants develop an infection, develop a brain hemorrhage, or even die. Given post-pandemic staffing shortages and the increased burden placed on nurses, routine measurement of missed care and managerial efforts to prevent it could be vital to improving the health and life course of VLBW infants.