Skip to main content

Glanz Publication Illustrates Ways to Enhance Collaboration in Researching the Built Environment

A new publication from Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH, George A. Weiss University Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, and colleagues, identifies gaps and uncovers ways to help multidisciplinary teams collaborate more effectively to yield greater health impact.

Karen Glanz is in this story. Built environments (manufactured surroundings that provide the setting for human activity) and the policies that shape them are increasingly considered key determinants of health behaviors related to obesity and other chronic diseases.

Multiple disciplines, including nutrition, public health, urban planning, transportation and economics, can provide key perspectives in how to assess the built environment related to improving health.

But because the analytic methods, metrics and measurement strategies vary greatly from each discipline, collaborative interaction can be difficult.

A new publication from Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH, George A. Weiss University Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, and colleagues, identifies gaps and uncovers ways to help multidisciplinary teams collaborate more effectively to yield greater health impact. She and her team used lessons from inter-professional education and team science to identify ways to promote cross-disciplinary collaboration in assessing and researching built environments.

Glanz’s paper, Built Environment Assessment: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, has been published in SSM-Population Health. Her co-authors included: Susan L. Handy (University of California at Davis); Kathryn E. Henderson (Henderson Consulting); Sandy J. Slater (University of Illinois at Chicago); Erica L. Davis (University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine); and Lisa M. Powell (University of Illinois at Chicago).

Glanz, a globally influential public health scholar, is a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the School of Medicine, and director of the University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center. She is a Senior Fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute on Health Economics, the Center for Public Health Initiatives, and the Penn Institute for Urban Research, as well as a Distinguished Fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center.

This work was supported by grant 2010-85215-20659 from the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative of the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The research team reports no financial conflicts of interest.