A world-class city filled with art and culture and an incredible campus that offers cutting edge resources–that’s what students receive at Penn Nursing. And that’s just the start. Penn Nursing and the wider university offer something for everyone, as well as a lifelong community.

Penn Nursing is globally known for educating dynamic nurses—because our School values evidence-based science and health equity. That’s where our expertise lies, whether in research, practice, community health, or beyond. Everything we do upholds a through-line of innovation, encouraging our exceptional students, alumni, and faculty share their knowledge and skills to reshape health care.

Penn Nursing students are bold and unafraid, ready to embrace any challenge that comes their way. Whether you are exploring a career in nursing or interested in advancing your nursing career, a Penn Nursing education will help you meet your goals and become an innovative leader, prepared to change the face of health and wellness.

Penn Nursing is the #1-ranked nursing school in the world. Its highly-ranked programs help develop highly-skilled leaders in health care who are prepared to work alongside communities to tackle issues of health equity and social justice to improve health and wellness for everyone.

Penn Nursing’s rigorous academic curricula are taught by world renowned experts, ensuring that students at every level receive an exceptional Ivy League education. From augmented reality classrooms and clinical simulations to coursework that includes experiential global travel to clinical placements in top notch facilities, a Penn Nursing education prepares our graduates to lead.

Improving Trauma Pain Outcomes

Improving acute pain management after traumatic injury remains a priority for policymakers and clinicians as rates of injury and subsequent pain-related disability rise nationally. Yet, innovations in trauma pain management remain understudied.

November 11, 2019
Penn Nursing's Rosemary Polomano, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Practice, Professor of Pain Practice Penn Nursing, and co-investigato...
Penn Nursing’s Rosemary Polomano, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Practice, Professor of Pain Practice Penn Nursing, and co-investigator of the study.
Co-investigator Nicholas A. Giordano, PhD, RN.
Co-investigator Nicholas A. Giordano, PhD, RN.

A 7-year prospective cohort study from the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center (CMCVAMC), University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania examined the relationship between regional anesthesia (RA) administration and patient-reported pain-related outcomes among Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom service members sustaining a combat-related extremity injury. The study, done in collaboration with the Department of Defense – Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management (DVCIPM), found that when integrated into combat casualty care, early use of RA is associated with sustained pain benefits throughout rehabilitation and recovery.

“The improvements in average pain and pain relief in the first six months after injury observed in our study indicate a strong association between receiving early RA after combat injury in the austere battlefield environment and improved long-term pain outcomes,” said Penn Nursing’s Rosemary Polomano, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean for Practice, Professor of Pain Practice Penn Nursing, and co-investigator of the study. “These results suggest that effective, agile pain interventions initiated close to the time of injury can play an important role in reducing future pain.”

The results of the study have been published in the journal Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine in an article titled “Prospective Cohort Study Examining the Use of Regional Anesthesia for Early Pain Management After Combat-related Extremity Injury.”

The principal investigator is Rollin M. Gallagher, MD, MPH, of the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia; and other co-investigators are Chester C. Buckenmaier, MD and Nicholas A. Giordano, PhD, RN, both of the DVCIPM, Department of Military and Emergency Medicine and Uniformed Services University; John T. Farrar, MD, PhD, Wensheng Guo, PhD, and Lynn Taylor, PhD, all of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania; David Oslin, MD, of the Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania ; and Brandon J. Goff, DO, of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, United States Army Brooke Army Medical Center.

The research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VARRD D45064-1).

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