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CHOPR Receives NIH funding to educate doctoral students in “Advanced Training in Nursing Outcomes” in December 1999

We are proud of the many brilliant nurse leaders who began their journey with the faculty of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research and have continued to make a huge impact on health care, economics, and society.

Sean P. Clarke, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Professor, Boston CollegeSean P. Clarke, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Professor, Boston CollegeDr. Sean P. Clarke started his nursing career as one of the Center’s first postdoctoral fellows in Nursing Outcomes Research. Within two years, he joined the standing faculty at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and served as the Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research from 2001-2008.Today, Dr. Clarke is widely known for his work on patient safety, work environments and workforce issues.

“My time at CHOPR gave me unparalleled opportunities to work under close supervision on the development of protocol applications, on data collections, and on analyses and preparation of articles. For the right trainee, there is simply no better place in the country to learn to do this type of research.”

Patricia A. Patrician, PhD, RN, FAAN,  Colonel, US Army (Retired), Professor and Rachel Z. Booth Endowed Chair, The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of NursingPatricia A. Patrician, PhD, RN, FAAN,  Colonel, US Army (Retired), Professor and Rachel Z. Booth Endowed Chair, The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of NursingDr. Patrcia A. Patrician joined the CHOPR trainees in the late 90s and finished with a Phd in 2002. She is currently a PI on a study of mortality, readmissions, and failure to rescue in military hospitals. She and her team recently completed a program evaluation of the US Army’s Patient CaringTouch System. She teaches in the PhD program, mentors pre- and post-doctoral students and fellows and conducts research on nurse staffing, the nursing practice environment, and quality and safety patient and nurse outcomes.

“My training has had a profound impact on my research career. Working with faculty and other fellows at CHOPR was instrumental in preparing me for not only research, but also my academic career.”

Christopher R. Friese, PhD, RN, FAAN, Elizabeth Tone Hosmer Professor, University of Michigan, defended his thesis "Hospital Nursing Organization and Outcomes for Surgical Oncology Patients" in 2005.Christopher R. Friese, PhD, RN, FAAN, Elizabeth Tone Hosmer Professor, University of Michigan, defended his thesis "Hospital Nursing Organization and Outcomes for Surgical Oncology Patients" in 2005.Dr. Christopher R. Friese received his BSN and MSN from Penn Nursing, before applying for a predoctoral fellowship at the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research. Today, Christopher Friese’s program of research is focused on understanding and improving healthcare delivery in high-risk settings, such as cancer. He teaches organizational theory and systems for healthcare for every level nursing student and is a mentor to honors students and scholars.

“The CHOPR Trainee program is arguably one of the most productive programs in the country, and has the infrastructure that is critical to develop outstanding nurse scientists. There are few places in higher education where the alignment of faculty, academic specialties, and a commitment to highly interdis-ciplinary, supportive training for nursing scholarship is so optimal.”

M. Katherine Hutchinson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, Connell School of NursingM. Katherine Hutchinson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, Connell School of Nursing

Dr. M. Katherine Hutchinson completed a CHOPR postdoctoral fellowship in Nursing Outcomes Research in 2001. Since that time, she has been principal- or co-investigator on numerous NIH-funded research projects. Today, Dr. Hutchinson’s research focuses on adolescent and young adult risk behaviors and influential parenting behaviors. She developed an instrument to measure parent-teen sexual risk communication which has been used by researchers across the U.S. and around the world. 

“The training I received at CHOPR was life and trajectory-altering. It has allowed me to pursue my own research agenda as well as training others to do the same.”