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Leadership History

History of Leadership  Distinguished Nursing Leaders


Dr. Linda H. Aiken with Penn Nursing leaders and staff upon receiving the <a href="https://nam.edu/about-the-nam/gustav-o-lienhard-award/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care</a> from the National Academy of Medicine.Dr. Linda H. Aiken with Penn Nursing leaders and staff upon receiving the Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care from the National Academy of Medicine.CHOPR Research asks the question
“to what extent adjustable organizational features of nursing determine patient outcomes in different settings and for different patients.”


Linda H. Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN
Director: Since 1989

Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing, Professor of Sociology, School of Arts & Sciences <div class="additional-titles">Director, Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research</div>Linda H. Aiken is the Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing and Professor of Sociology, School of Arts & Sciences. She became a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 1976, and a member of the National Academies of Medicine in 1981. She is an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Nursing in the United Kingdom in 1998. She has a PhD in Sociology from the University of Texas at Austin and a Master’s in Nursing from the University of Florida, where she is a proud Gator, right up until today. She is also the recipient of eight honorary degrees. She has received several major research prizes including the Christiane Reimann Prize from the International Council of Nurses, the Gustav O. Lienhard Award from the National Academy of Sciences, the Research!America Raymond and Beverly Sackler Award for Sustained National Leadership in Health Research, and the Individual Ernest A. Codman Award, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. 
Read More About Linda H. Aiken here
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Eileen T. Lake, PhD, MSN, MA, BSN, FAAN
Associate Director: Since 2008
Eileen T. Lake is the Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy, an Associate Professor of Nursing, and an Associate Professor of Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences. She received a PhD in Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999, and an MSN in Nursing Administration from Penn in 1997. She became a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 2008. She received the Distinguished Alumna Award from Duke University School of Nursing, the Research Mentor Award, from AcademyHealth and was recently honored with the Deans Award for Scholarly Mentorship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.
Read More About Eileen T. Lake here


Matthew D. McHugh, PhD, JD, MPH, RN, CRNP, FAAN
Associate Director: Since 2013
Matthew D. McHugh is The Independence Chair for Nursing Education Professor. He is also the Faculty Director, Nursing and Health Care Management Coordinated Dual Degree Program. He became a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 2013. He was also the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Faculty Scholar. He received an MSN from the University of Pennsylvania, an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2003, PhD in Nursing from the University of Pennsylvania in 2004, and a JD from Northeastern University School of Law in 2006.
Read more about Matthew D. McHugh here


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Our History Starts with Decades of Identifying Key Issues In Nursing Outcomes Research

Dean Emerita, Dr. Claire M. Fagin with Center Director, Dr. Linda H. Aiken at a recent Fagin Award PresentationDean Emerita, Dr. Claire M. Fagin with Center Director, Dr. Linda H. Aiken at a recent Fagin Award PresentationThe Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research was founded more than 25 years ago and is home to the winner of the Christiane Reimann Prize, the Gustav O. Lienhard Award, the AcademyHealth Distinguished Investigator Award, and the Individual Ernest A. Codman Award to name a few. Using a sociological approach to study the complex organizations of healthcare, CHOPR has built a program of research that asks the question, “to what extent adjustable organizational features of nursing determine patient outcomes in different settings and for different patients?”, effectively founding nursing outcomes research. CHOPR’s work continues to build the body of evidence for nursing outcomes to approach causality by studying different settings, different populations, and in different countries with a focus on value; and applies innovative quantitative methods to study the outcomes of nursing including patient matching, clinical registries, and detailed studies across the health system using very granular clinical patient data as a mechanism to expand design approaches and move into translational research areas.