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Sample Plan of Study

Year 1:

Fall (4 Course Units)

NURS061
Biologically-Based Chemistry

A contextual approach will be used in studying the concepts in General, Organic and Biological Chemistry that are foundational to an understanding of normal cellular processes. Topics that will be covered include measurements, atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, properties of gases and liquids, solutions, equilibrium, acids and bases, pH, buffers, nuclear chemistry, nomenclature and properties of the main organic functional groups, and the structures and function of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids.

NURS068
Integrated Cell Biology & Microbiology

This course will include the major topics of cell biology and microbiology that are foundational for an understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Topics will include the brief study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structures and functions; the main biological molecules; membrane transport; cellular communications; the flow of genetic information; cell division; and cellular metabolism. The course will also examine the role of cells and microbes in human health and infectious diseases. It will include a description of the main types of microbes, how they are identified, their growth requirements, and the role of the immune system in controlling infections, the control of microbes, host-microbe interactions. The context for this course will be the application of cell biology and microbiology for understanding the cellular basis of cancer and infectious human infection disease processes. This course will include special sessions from a clinical perspective in the various fields of medicine, microbiology, and immunology.

NURS101
The Nature of Nursing Practice

This course facilitates students’ ability to conceptualize the experiences of individuals, families, communities, and populations living with health and illness. It emphasizes the integration of knowledge from other disciplines and of nursing science as the basis for practice. The course introduces the four core themes of the undergraduate nursing program: engagement, inquiry, judgment, and voice and examines how the themes are used to characterize the nature of nursing practice.

English Writing Requirement

Students can fulfill the writing requirement in the School of Nursing by choosing one of the following:

  • A Critical Writing Seminar in a variety of disciplines such as History, English, Anthropology, Folklore, etc. (numbered WRIT 012 – 099)
  • WRIT 002 – Craft of Prose
  • WRIT 011 – Writing Seminar in Global English

A comprehensive list of writing courses can be found at: http://www.writing.upenn.edu/critical/

Language Requirement (or free elective if level IV proficiency met)

 

Students must demonstrate level IV proficiency to complete the language requirement. Due to scheduling of clinical courses in the third and fourth years, students are advised to complete the language requirement by the end of their fourth semester. To fulfill the language requirement, or place into courses beyond the first level, students may take and submit one of the following:

  • SAT II Language Achievement.

All other incoming students will have the opportunity to take a University of Pennsylvania departmental placement exam during New Student Orientation. Results of the placement exam will indicate the course level to be taken, or whether the student has placed out of all four levels and is exempt from the language requirement. No credit is awarded for completion of the exam; it is used only for the purpose of evaluating language competency for course placement.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill all four levels of the language requirement through successful completion of one of the above-mentioned tests must take either four additional language courses or four free electives (necessary to reach the 40.5 course units required for graduation). Exception: If AP credit is awarded, the student may only need three additional language courses or free electives.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill only part of the language requirement must take the remaining language courses and free elective(s). For example, students who place into the level III Spanish course must take two Spanish courses (levels III and IV) and two free electives to replace levels I and II. Students who request a language course at a lower level than their placement test indicated will not get credit for that course. Students who place out of part of one language and who do not wish to continue study in that language may begin a new language but must take all four levels/semesters.

Language courses or free electives may be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Spring (5.5 Course Units)

NURS065
Fundamentals of Nutrition

Essentials of normal nutrition and their relationships to the health of individuals and families. These concepts serve as a basis for the development of an understanding of the therapeutic application of dietary principles and the nurse’s role and responsibility in this facet of patient care.

NURS102
Situating the Practice of Nursing

This course emphasizes not only how nursing is practiced, but also where it is practiced. The course further explores the four core themes of engagement, inquiry, judgment, and voice as it provides guided observational experiences in a wide variety of settings. These experiences help the student to discover what is not known and what is subsequently necessary to know. These experiences also explore the place of the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities in nursing practice. This course also will highlight the relationships between and among members of the interprofessional team and families and patients. NURS 102 fosters development of the professional role and sets the stage for life-long learning.

NURS163
Integrated Anatomy, Physiology, and Physical Assessment I

This is the first part of a two-semester course designed to provide a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body along with essential embryology and maturational physiology. Histological and gross anatomical features of selected organ systems are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms that enable the human body to maintain homeostasis. Within each system, deviations from normal are considered to situate the student’s understanding of health problems and to foster an appreciation for the complexity of the human organism. Integrated into each topic are the correlated physical assessment parameters and related procedural skills. Laboratories exercises and case study analysis provide a contextual base to acquire and use domain-specific knowledge of concern to the practice of nursing.

Sector Requirement

Undergraduate students in the School of Nursing must take the following sector requirements to earn their degree:

  • Arts and Letters (1 c.u.)
  • Society and Social Structures (1 c.u.)
  • Histories and Traditions (1 c.u.)
  • Global and Cultural Studies (1 c.u.)
  • Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships (1 c.u.)

In addition, students are also required to take one Free Elective (1 c.u.).

Sector requirements and free electives may be taken in any order and at any time during the undergraduate experience. More information regarding sectors, including a list of courses, can be found here.  

Sector Descriptions:

Arts and Letters: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of the arts — applied or theoretical — or in the humanities. Literature from linguistic traditions other than English should be in translation, as literature in the original suits the Global and Cultural Studies.

Society and Social Structures: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of sociology, social psychology, social structures, and studies of material including but not limited to individuals in groups, group behavior, organizations, systems, and institutions using contemporary sources.

Histories and Traditions: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of history, comparative history and historical methods and historical traditions in cultures and societies using historical sources.

Global and Cultural Studies: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of culture, cultural studies and interpretation including but not limited to current cultural traditions, folklore, literature in the original language and text that is not English, and any comparisons of literature and other cultural documents using contemporary sources.

Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of study that addresses logical, mathematical, and quantifiable relationships among any entities including ideas, people, groups, systems, and other social or technological structures. Specialized research approaches including field work, advanced statistics, and other methods further fulfill this aim.

Language Requirement (or free elective if level IV proficiency met)

 

Students must demonstrate level IV proficiency to complete the language requirement. Due to scheduling of clinical courses in the third and fourth years, students are advised to complete the language requirement by the end of their fourth semester. To fulfill the language requirement, or place into courses beyond the first level, students may take and submit one of the following:

  • SAT II Language Achievement.

All other incoming students will have the opportunity to take a University of Pennsylvania departmental placement exam during New Student Orientation. Results of the placement exam will indicate the course level to be taken, or whether the student has placed out of all four levels and is exempt from the language requirement. No credit is awarded for completion of the exam; it is used only for the purpose of evaluating language competency for course placement.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill all four levels of the language requirement through successful completion of one of the above-mentioned tests must take either four additional language courses or four free electives (necessary to reach the 40.5 course units required for graduation). Exception: If AP credit is awarded, the student may only need three additional language courses or free electives.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill only part of the language requirement must take the remaining language courses and free elective(s). For example, students who place into the level III Spanish course must take two Spanish courses (levels III and IV) and two free electives to replace levels I and II. Students who request a language course at a lower level than their placement test indicated will not get credit for that course. Students who place out of part of one language and who do not wish to continue study in that language may begin a new language but must take all four levels/semesters.

Language courses or free electives may be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Year 2:

Fall (5 Course Units)

NURS103
Psychological and Social Diversity in Health and Wellness

This course explores and integrates the intersection of psychological, cognitive, and social development with the lived experiences of individuals, families, and communities across the lifespan in order to conduct socially contextualized health assessments and health teaching. Extant theories will be critically analyzed and examined with respect to issues of health care access, health history, health promotion, and issues of equity and diversity from a life-course perspective. This knowledge will be synthesized and integrated with the development of the student’s communication skills and interviewing processes necessary to develop socially attuned health history and teaching that promote psychological well being and healthy lifestyles. Simulated and observational experiences provide students with opportunities to acquire and apply knowledge necessary for conducting a comprehensive health history of an individual situated within a diverse community. They also provide opportunities to develop prioritized health teaching plans in partnership with that individual.

NURS164
Integrated Human Anatomy, Physiology & Physical Assessment II

This is the second part of a two semester course designed to provide a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body along with essential embryology and maturational physiology. Histological and gross anatomical features of selected organ systems are related to the physiologic and biochemical mechanisms that enable the human body to maintain homeostasis. Within each system, deviations from normal are considered to situate the student’s understanding of health problems and to foster an appreciation for the complexity of the human organism. Integrated laboratories and case studies provide a contextual base to acquire and use domain-specific knowledge that includes physical assessment, and procedural.

Sector Requirement

 

Undergraduate students in the School of Nursing must take the following sector requirements to earn their degree:

  • Arts and Letters (1 c.u.)
  • Society and Social Structures (1 c.u.)
  • Histories and Traditions (1 c.u.)
  • Global and Cultural Studies (1 c.u.)
  • Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships (1 c.u.)

In addition, students are also required to take one Free Elective (1 c.u.).

Sector requirements and free electives may be taken in any order and at any time during the undergraduate experience. More information regarding sectors, including a list of courses, can be found here.  

Sector Descriptions:

Arts and Letters: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of the arts — applied or theoretical — or in the humanities. Literature from linguistic traditions other than English should be in translation, as literature in the original suits the Global and Cultural Studies.

Society and Social Structures: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of sociology, social psychology, social structures, and studies of material including but not limited to individuals in groups, group behavior, organizations, systems, and institutions using contemporary sources.

Histories and Traditions: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of history, comparative history and historical methods and historical traditions in cultures and societies using historical sources.

Global and Cultural Studies: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of culture, cultural studies and interpretation including but not limited to current cultural traditions, folklore, literature in the original language and text that is not English, and any comparisons of literature and other cultural documents using contemporary sources.

Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of study that addresses logical, mathematical, and quantifiable relationships among any entities including ideas, people, groups, systems, and other social or technological structures. Specialized research approaches including field work, advanced statistics, and other methods further fulfill this aim.

Language Requirement (or free elective if level IV proficiency met)

 

Students must demonstrate level IV proficiency to complete the language requirement. Due to scheduling of clinical courses in the third and fourth years, students are advised to complete the language requirement by the end of their fourth semester. To fulfill the language requirement, or place into courses beyond the first level, students may take and submit one of the following:

  • SAT II Language Achievement.

All other incoming students will have the opportunity to take a University of Pennsylvania departmental placement exam during New Student Orientation. Results of the placement exam will indicate the course level to be taken, or whether the student has placed out of all four levels and is exempt from the language requirement. No credit is awarded for completion of the exam; it is used only for the purpose of evaluating language competency for course placement.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill all four levels of the language requirement through successful completion of one of the above-mentioned tests must take either four additional language courses or four free electives (necessary to reach the 40.5 course units required for graduation). Exception: If AP credit is awarded, the student may only need three additional language courses or free electives.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill only part of the language requirement must take the remaining language courses and free elective(s). For example, students who place into the level III Spanish course must take two Spanish courses (levels III and IV) and two free electives to replace levels I and II. Students who request a language course at a lower level than their placement test indicated will not get credit for that course. Students who place out of part of one language and who do not wish to continue study in that language may begin a new language but must take all four levels/semesters.

Language courses or free electives may be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Spring (5.5 Course Units)

NURS165
Integrated Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics

Pathophysiologic concepts and processes are introduced with major emphasis on commonly occurring acute and chronic illnesses and their therapeutic interventions. Major classes of drugs that are used to support organ function are explored. The physiological and pathophysiological rationale for each drug indication, mechanisms of drug action, individualized dosing implications, and adverse drug events will be explored for prototypical agents used in the selected cases. The course will enhance the student’s comprehension of the scientific complexity of therapeutic interventions in various conditions and will build upon the foundational sciences. Additionally the course will provide the student with sufficient scientific knowledge and skills to prepare administer and monitor drugs and therapies in a safe and effective manner.

NURS215
Nursing of Women and Infants

This course emphasizes the child-bearing cycle, and the related issues of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. It also explores women and infant’s health care and health promotion needs across the lifespan. It provides a global perspective, and uses the United Nations’ Pillars of Safe Motherhood and World Health Organization’s Millennium Development Goals as the vehicles to enable students to understand the interrelationships among issues of health and health promotion; social, economic, political and environmental contexts; and the care of women across the lifespan. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to understand the connections between the local and the global; to use their developing knowledge base to affect the health of women and their infants. Students will have opportunities for hospital-based care of child-bearing women and their infants. In addition, community-based experiences with individual women and with groups of women across the life cycle will be provided in order to enhance teaching, interviewing and assessment skills.

Sector Requirement

 

Undergraduate students in the School of Nursing must take the following sector requirements to earn their degree:

  • Arts and Letters (1 c.u.)
  • Society and Social Structures (1 c.u.)
  • Histories and Traditions (1 c.u.)
  • Global and Cultural Studies (1 c.u.)
  • Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships (1 c.u.)

In addition, students are also required to take one Free Elective (1 c.u.).

Sector requirements and free electives may be taken in any order and at any time during the undergraduate experience. More information regarding sectors, including a list of courses, can be found here.  

Sector Descriptions:

Arts and Letters: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of the arts — applied or theoretical — or in the humanities. Literature from linguistic traditions other than English should be in translation, as literature in the original suits the Global and Cultural Studies.

Society and Social Structures: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of sociology, social psychology, social structures, and studies of material including but not limited to individuals in groups, group behavior, organizations, systems, and institutions using contemporary sources.

Histories and Traditions: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of history, comparative history and historical methods and historical traditions in cultures and societies using historical sources.

Global and Cultural Studies: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of culture, cultural studies and interpretation including but not limited to current cultural traditions, folklore, literature in the original language and text that is not English, and any comparisons of literature and other cultural documents using contemporary sources.

Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of study that addresses logical, mathematical, and quantifiable relationships among any entities including ideas, people, groups, systems, and other social or technological structures. Specialized research approaches including field work, advanced statistics, and other methods further fulfill this aim.

Language Requirement (or free elective if level IV proficiency met)

 

Students must demonstrate level IV proficiency to complete the language requirement. Due to scheduling of clinical courses in the third and fourth years, students are advised to complete the language requirement by the end of their fourth semester. To fulfill the language requirement, or place into courses beyond the first level, students may take and submit one of the following:

  • SAT II Language Achievement.

All other incoming students will have the opportunity to take a University of Pennsylvania departmental placement exam during New Student Orientation. Results of the placement exam will indicate the course level to be taken, or whether the student has placed out of all four levels and is exempt from the language requirement. No credit is awarded for completion of the exam; it is used only for the purpose of evaluating language competency for course placement.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill all four levels of the language requirement through successful completion of one of the above-mentioned tests must take either four additional language courses or four free electives (necessary to reach the 40.5 course units required for graduation). Exception: If AP credit is awarded, the student may only need three additional language courses or free electives.

Incoming first-year students who fulfill only part of the language requirement must take the remaining language courses and free elective(s). For example, students who place into the level III Spanish course must take two Spanish courses (levels III and IV) and two free electives to replace levels I and II. Students who request a language course at a lower level than their placement test indicated will not get credit for that course. Students who place out of part of one language and who do not wish to continue study in that language may begin a new language but must take all four levels/semesters.

Language courses or free electives may be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Year 3:

Fall (5 Course Units)

NURS230
Statistics for Research and Measurement

This course examines statistical methods used by scientists in the analysis of research data. The fundamental theorem for this course is the “square root law” (central limit theorem). Students become literate in statistical terminology and symbols and knowledgeable of assumptions for statistical tests. Fundamental statistics include basic theorems and principles, sample, population and data distributions, measures of central tendency, correlational techniques, and commonly used parametric and nonparametric statistical tests. Parameters for inferential and descriptive statistics are examined as the basis for explaining the results from research studies. Students apply chance models in estimating confidence intervals of percentages and means, and in hypothesis testing. This content is taught in the context of nursing research and measurement of nursing phenomena. Examination of research publications enable students to apply their knowledge to reading and understanding data analyses used in studies. Students evaluate tables and graphs as ways to summarize research findings. Course content prepares students to examine statistical and clinical significance of research findings.

NURS245
Nursing of Young and Middle Aged Adults

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of young and middle aged adults who experience functional status impairments as a result of serious illness or injury. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses nursing phenomena of concern, including risk factors for illness or injury, strategies to overcome barriers and support personal health resources, alleviate suffering and reduce the impact of illness or injury on the functioning of the person. Content and clinical experiences integrate developmental and role issues; policy, cultural and ethical considerations. Clinical experiences in acute care hospital units and simulation experiences provide opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care, and knowledge integration.

NURS255
Nursing of Older Adults

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of older adults. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses nursing phenomena of concern including the unique set of principles and body of knowledge and skills necessary to the practice of nursing with older adults. Students are provided with the theoretical background necessary to understand health system issues affecting older adults. Students will attain the knowledge necessary to complete a comprehensive assessment of the older adult’s physical, functional, psychosocial, and cognitive capacities. Common problems associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, musculoskeletal, sensory, and genitourinary systems that affect older adults will be discussed. In addition, principles of continuity of care, rehabilitation, nutritional and pharmacodynamic changes, cultural diversity and ethics will be integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences in acute care hospitals and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care, and knowledge integration.Special emphasis is placed on transitional care for older adults across the health care continuum.

And either a Policy or Ethics Course:

NURS330
Theoretical Foundations of Health Care Ethics

The theoretical foundations of health care ethics including definitions of ethics, history of bioethics and nursing ethics, and the influence of religion,psychology of moral development and philosophy in the development of ethical theory. Nursing code of ethics, changing ideas in ethics, and discussion of the developing profession of nursing are included.

NURS334
Public Policy and the Nation’s Health

This course examines health care and social policy from domestic and international perspectives. It is designed to engage undergraduate students in critical thinking about health policy issues as they affect our health care, employment, taxes, and social investments. The current national debate on health care reform is used as a frame of reference for examining the strengths and weaknesses of health care services in the U.S. from the perspectives of patients/families, health professionals, health services providers, insurers, employers, and public policy makers, and the pros and cons of a range of prescriptions for system improvement from across the political spectrum. About a third of the course focuses more specifically on global public health challenges and the policy strategies for reducing health disparities worldwide.

Students may elect to take an alternative ethics or policy course as listed in the BSN Handbook.

Spring (5 CU)

NURS225
Pediatric Nursing

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of infants, children, adolescents and their families. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. It addresses pediatric nursing phenomena of concern and major final common pathways of pediatric illness from infancy through adolescence using a using a developmental and systems approach. Emphasis is placed on family-centered care through transitions in the illness and recovery phases. The course emphasizes clinical reasoning; family centered strategies for optimizing health and maintaining individuality; promoting optimal developmental, physiological, and psychological functioning; and enhancing strengths within the context of family. Clinical experiences at various children’s hospitals and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and knowledge integration.

NURS235
Psychiatric Nursing

This course examines how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of individuals and families experiencing severe psychiatric distress. It focuses on the knowledge and skill acquisition needed to care for these patients at particular moments, across the continuum of care, and through transitions in an illness experience. The course addresses nursing phenomena of concern related the meanings of an illness experience, the development of healing relationships with or within individuals, families, and groups, and on the advanced communication strategies needed to engage individual and families in mental health promotion strategies. It also provides the tools to enable students to construct effective treatment groups with patients; work groups with disciplinary and inter-professional colleagues; and to understand the healing dimensions of environments. Clinical and simulation experiences provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and clinically situated knowledge integration.

NURS547
Scientific Inquiry for Evidence-based Practice

This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of the research process, methods of scientific inquiry, and analytical techniques. Students acquire knowledge of systematic approaches used by scientists to design and conduct studies. Course content prepares students to appraise quantitative and qualitative research, and evaluate the scientific merit and clinical significance of research for translation into practice. Evidence-based guidelines are examined and rated for strength of evidence and expert consensus using evidence grading systems and defined criteria. Students engage in variety of creative learning experiences to facilitate appreciative inquiry, clinical reasoning, and evidence-based practice. Quality improvement, comparative effectiveness analyses, information science, and electronic health systems technology demonstrate the capacity for measurement and surveillance of nursing-sensitive and other outcomes used to evaluate quality nursing care and test interventions. Ethical, legal and health policy implications for research are explored. This course serves as the basis for scientific inquiry about human experiences to address important problems that require solutions and to expand the research and the evidence base for professional nursing practice.

And either a Policy or Ethics Course:

NURS330
Theoretical Foundations of Health Care Ethics

The theoretical foundations of health care ethics including definitions of ethics, history of bioethics and nursing ethics, and the influence of religion,psychology of moral development and philosophy in the development of ethical theory. Nursing code of ethics, changing ideas in ethics, and discussion of the developing profession of nursing are included.

NURS334
Public Policy and the Nation’s Health

This course examines health care and social policy from domestic and international perspectives. It is designed to engage undergraduate students in critical thinking about health policy issues as they affect our health care, employment, taxes, and social investments. The current national debate on health care reform is used as a frame of reference for examining the strengths and weaknesses of health care services in the U.S. from the perspectives of patients/families, health professionals, health services providers, insurers, employers, and public policy makers, and the pros and cons of a range of prescriptions for system improvement from across the political spectrum. About a third of the course focuses more specifically on global public health challenges and the policy strategies for reducing health disparities worldwide.

Students may elect to take an alternative ethics or policy course as listed in the BSN Handbook.

Year 4:

Fall (5 Course Units)

NURS380
Nursing in the Community

This course considers how nursing influences the health and healing capacities of both communities as a whole (populations) and of groups, families, and individuals living within particular communities locally and globally. It addresses the complexity of nursing practice using a public health paradigm. It requires students to draw from prior class and clinical knowledge and skills and apply this practice base to communities across care settings, ages, and cultures with different experiences of equity and access to care. It provides the tools needed to engage in collaborative community work and to give voice to the community’s strengths, needs, and goals. It also moves students from an individual and family focus to a population focus for health assessment and intervention. Students consider the science, policies, and resources that support public health, and community based and community-oriented care. Clinical and simulated experiences in community settings provide sufficient opportunities for clinical reasoning, clinical care and knowledge integration in community settings. Students will have opportunities to care for patients and populations within selected communities.

Sector Requirement

Undergraduate students in the School of Nursing must take the following sector requirements to earn their degree:

  • Arts and Letters (1 c.u.)
  • Society and Social Structures (1 c.u.)
  • Histories and Traditions (1 c.u.)
  • Global and Cultural Studies (1 c.u.)
  • Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships (1 c.u.)

In addition, students are also required to take one Free Elective (1 c.u.).

Sector requirements and free electives may be taken in any order and at any time during the undergraduate experience. More information regarding sectors, including a list of courses, can be found here.  

Sector Descriptions:

Arts and Letters: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of the arts — applied or theoretical — or in the humanities. Literature from linguistic traditions other than English should be in translation, as literature in the original suits the Global and Cultural Studies.

Society and Social Structures: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of sociology, social psychology, social structures, and studies of material including but not limited to individuals in groups, group behavior, organizations, systems, and institutions using contemporary sources.

Histories and Traditions: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of history, comparative history and historical methods and historical traditions in cultures and societies using historical sources.

Global and Cultural Studies: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of culture, cultural studies and interpretation including but not limited to current cultural traditions, folklore, literature in the original language and text that is not English, and any comparisons of literature and other cultural documents using contemporary sources.

Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of study that addresses logical, mathematical, and quantifiable relationships among any entities including ideas, people, groups, systems, and other social or technological structures. Specialized research approaches including field work, advanced statistics, and other methods further fulfill this aim.

Sector Requirement

Undergraduate students in the School of Nursing must take the following sector requirements to earn their degree:

  • Arts and Letters (1 c.u.)
  • Society and Social Structures (1 c.u.)
  • Histories and Traditions (1 c.u.)
  • Global and Cultural Studies (1 c.u.)
  • Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships (1 c.u.)

In addition, students are also required to take one Free Elective (1 c.u.).

Sector requirements and free electives may be taken in any order and at any time during the undergraduate experience. More information regarding sectors, including a list of courses, can be found here.  

Sector Descriptions:

Arts and Letters: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of the arts — applied or theoretical — or in the humanities. Literature from linguistic traditions other than English should be in translation, as literature in the original suits the Global and Cultural Studies.

Society and Social Structures: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of sociology, social psychology, social structures, and studies of material including but not limited to individuals in groups, group behavior, organizations, systems, and institutions using contemporary sources.

Histories and Traditions: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of history, comparative history and historical methods and historical traditions in cultures and societies using historical sources.

Global and Cultural Studies: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of culture, cultural studies and interpretation including but not limited to current cultural traditions, folklore, literature in the original language and text that is not English, and any comparisons of literature and other cultural documents using contemporary sources.

Reasoning, Systems, and Relationships: Any course numbered 499 or below that provides breadth in an area of study that addresses logical, mathematical, and quantifiable relationships among any entities including ideas, people, groups, systems, and other social or technological structures. Specialized research approaches including field work, advanced statistics, and other methods further fulfill this aim.

* Students must also add a Case Study.

Spring (5.5 Course Units)

NURS389
Research/Inquiry-Based Service Residency

This course is designed to facilitate students’ intellectual curiosity and independence in exploring the research process relevant to an area of interest. Students expand their research knowledge base provided in NURS 230 and NURS 547 through a structured individualized faculty mentored experience based on specific learning objectives. Students identify a faculty advisor and, in collaboration with the advisor, define learning objectives to guide a plan of study. All research or inquiry residencies are under the guidance of a faculty member in the School of Nursing, but students may also interact with affiliated investigators and clinicians who contribute to and enrich the course. The residency offers students opportunities to experience at any level systematic methods for research, or service-based clinical inquiry or quality improvement.This mentored residency can be fulfilled by one of the following options: * Research-based practicum in basic science, clinical research, nursing history, healthcare policy, ethics, or informatics. * Inquiry-based Service practicum such as conducting quality improvement procedures or program evaluations in an affiliated healthcare institution. * Taking one of the University’s Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) courses with prior approval by the Steering Committee. * Individualized study abroad experience with prior approval by the Steering Committee.

NURS390
Leadership in the Complex Healthcare System

This two-part course provides the didactic and clinical experiences in increasingly complex nursing care situations and environments which facilitate the students’ transition to independent practice. In the lecture component, the focus is on the integration of knowledge and skill for nursing practice and develops the ability of students to see nursing practice as part of a complex system. It examines systems thinking and complexity, development of a leadership role and skills, inter-professional communication and teamwork, and leading change in healthcare organizations. This course also examines the nurse’s role in improvement science and patient care delivery, focusing on quality improvement processes, patient safety, nurse sensitive process and outcome metrics with micro-systems. This course also allows students to develop the capacity for clinical expertise, leadership, and for translating the science of the profession into practice. Students also are assigned to a seminar component that is correlated with their selected site for the specialty clinical practicum. This aspect of the course allows the student to develop additional expertise in a specialty area of practice and to develop competences specific to that population of patients.These seminar components are adult health and illness; adult critical care, obstetrics/labor & delivery, psychiatric/mental health, and pediatrics. Advanced simulation experiences and extensive clinical practice in an area of the students’ choice provide multiple opportunities to synthesize the multidimensional aspects of nursing, and provide the environment which facilitates transition to professional nursing practice. Students select from a variety of settings in which to refine their practice skills. Principles of leadership, accountability and change will be applied to clinical practice as the student begins to operationalize the professional nursing role. Emphasis is placed on the nurse as a knowledgeable provider of health care who is both a change agent and advocate.

* Students must also add a Nursing Elective and a Free Elective.

Case Study

Students must choose one of the following case study courses, which can be taken in either the fall or spring semester:

NURS355
Case Study: Self-care of Chronic Illness

TBD

NURS356
Case Study: Culture of Birth

This course will explore the cultural context of birth and the activities of women and professionals and/or attendants in meeting the health care needs of pregnant women. The history of caring for women at birth, international health care, cultural mores/societal values, place of birth, psychosocial factors, ethical decision-making and the role of technology are content areas that will be discussed.

NURS358
Case Study: Nurses and the Child Welfare System

TBD

NURS359
Case Study: Quality Care Challenges in an Evolving Health Care Market

Quality care is an issue for consumers, providers, purchasers, and policy makers. This case study examines the multiple challenges that surround the quality of health care in the evolving United States health care marketplace. Through classroom discussion and special project experience, the student will become familiar with the concept of health care quality and approaches to the measurement and management of quality. Using Donabedian’s construct of structure, process and outcomes, strategies to improve quality while containing or reducing costs are reviewed, including the contributions of clinical practice guidelines. The evolving dominant structures for providing health care services, managed care and integrated delivery systems, and their approaches to quality management and reporting will be explored.

NURS360
Case Study: Nursing Practice with HIV+ Patients

This course is directed at the need to increase nursing majors knowledge and clinical expertice in the care of persons with HIV/AIDS. Hands on clinical practice with nurses who are AIDS experts will be combined with seminars that provide epidemiologic, clinical assessment, infection control, symptom management, patient teaching, psychosocial, ethical, cultural, political, and policy information.

NURS361
Case Study: Breast Feeding & Human Lactation

Human milk is recognized universally as the optimal diet for newborn infants. The health benefits of breastfeeding are so significant that a National Health Objective set forth by the Surgeon General of the United States for the year 2010 is to increase the proportion of mothers who breastfeed their babies in the postpartum period. Through classroom and clinical experiences, this course will provide an in depth examination of the anatomy and physiology of lactation, essential aspects of establishing and maintaining lactation, and the nurses’ role in counseling the breastfeeding family. Emphasis will be placed on current research findings in the content area.

NURS362
Case Study: Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

This course will examine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in health promotion and disease prevention, as well as in acute and chronic health conditions, through evidence-based research and practice. Implications of CAM on culture, health disparities, society, economics, safety, legal, ethical, and health policy issues will be explored and discussed.

NURS363
Case Study: Aggressive Behavior in Healthcare: Assessment Prevention and Treatment

The escalating incidence and prevalence of aggression in the health care setting requires that providers acquire a new set of pragmatic competencies for managing its complex sequelae. This course presents theoretical frameworks for understanding, predicting, preventing and responding to aggressive behaviors across the life span. Historical, bio-behavioral, social, and cultural explanations for aggression will be synthesized and analyzed within the context of multiple points of entry into the health care system across clinical settings. Personal self-awareness, debriefing, and stress management techniques exemplify techniques to prevent untoward consequences in providers. This course also uses exemplars and a range of experiential learning strategies, including skill development, situation analysis, concept mapping, unfolding case studies and cooperative learning, to examine the assessment, prevention, treatment, and response to aggressive behavior in patients and management of its consequences in self and others.

NURS364
Case Study: Cancer

This elective case study offers students the opportunity to learn about the etiology, diagnosis, and management of cancer across the lifespan. Building on existing clinical knowledge and skills, students will explore cancer care from the perspectives of prevention, early detection, treatment, survivorship, and death. Observational clinical experiences and selected case studies will enhance students’ understanding of patients’ and families’ cancer experience.

NURS365
Case Study: Case Analysis in Clinical Nutrition

This course is designed for present and future nurse professionals who wish to increase their knowledge of nutrition and expertise and application of knowledge to achieve optimal health of clients and themselves. Principles of medical nutrition therapy in health care delivery are emphasized in periods of physiologic stress and metabolic alterations. Individual nutrient requirements are considered from pathophysiologic and iatrogenic influences on nutritional status. Nutritional considerations for disease states will be explored through epidemiological, prevalence, incidence, treatment and research data. Understanding application of medical nutrition therapy are included through case analysis and field experiences

NURS366
Case Study: Living with Dementia

Living with Dementia provides a two fold experience: guided observation of an individual with dementia and a seminar series on dementia - neuropathology, assessment, care and treatment. Students will interact with a person with AD and his/her caregiver. The goal is to understand the demented individual’s functional abilities and impact of environment on performance and behavior. A further goal is to develop an appreciation of the primary caregiver’s role and the strengths and limitations of community support systems. Each team of two to three will be assigned a family unit for study. In so far as possible, teams will be interdisciplinary.

NURS367
Case Study: Principles of Palliative Care

This course prepares students to collaborate effectively with an interdisciplinary team in assessing patients and families, and planning and evaluating palliative and end of life care for diverse populations with progressive illness in multiple health care settings. Course content and assignments focus on the nurse’s role in addressing the complex assessment and responses to the psychosocial and spiritual concerns of patients and caregivers across the trajectory of advanced illness.

NURS368
Case Study: Home Health Care

This course examines the major aspects of home-based care across patients’ life spans from acute to long term care. New trends, advances, and issues in home management of complex conditions, innovative delivery systems and legal, ethical and policy consideration will be explored.