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Ranked as the best nursing school in the world, Penn Nursing advances the entire profession, from research & education to practice & policy

Undergraduate and Transfer Programs

The undergraduate and transfer program uses hands-on, mentored education to transform what happens in the classroom to what happens in the clinical and beyond.

Accelerated Programs

The accelerated program suits students with ambition to expedite their education in order to enter a chosen career path as soon as possible.

Master’s Programs

The masters program offers the opportunity to step to the forefront of nursing science and practice in a wide range of specialties. 

Doctoral Programs

Our doctoral programs are committed to producing leaders in the field of nursing science, both in scholarship and research (PhD) and clinical scholarship and practice (DNP).

 

Today

Science Advisory: Advocating for Developmental Care for Infants With Complex Congenital Heart Disease

Developmental disorders, disabilities, and delays are common outcomes for infants with complex congenital heart disease. Targeting early factors influencing these conditions after birth and during neonatal hospitalization for cardiac surgery remains a critical need. However, significant gaps remain in understanding the best practices to improve neurodevelopmental and psychosocial outcomes for these infants.

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We All Just Want to Be Heard

Penn Medicine recently profiled Azucena (Susy) Villalobos, BSN, a nurse in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), a fellow in the Leonard A. Lauder Community Care Nurse Practitioner Program at Penn Nursing, and the president-elect of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN) Philadelphia chapter. Her profile was featured in HUPdate.

Better Staffed Hospitals Before Pandemic Had Better Outcomes During It

According to a new study published in Nursing Outlook, the journal of the American Academy of Nursing, chronic hospital nurse understaffing and poor hospital work environments that predated the Covid-19 pandemic largely explain the disruptions in nursing care seen during the pandemic and continuing today.

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Study Shows Missed Nursing Care is a Key Factor in Adverse Outcomes for Very Low Birthweight Infants

Sometimes hospital staff nurses cannot provide required care due to time constraints. This reality can contribute to potentially dire outcomes for very low birthweight (VLBW) infants, who weigh less than 3.3 lbs. at birth. These newborns depend on the nurse for survival. Missed nursing care is likely clinically relevant to whether VLBW infants develop an infection, develop a brain hemorrhage, or even die. Given post-pandemic staffing shortages and the increased burden placed on nurses, routine measurement of missed care and managerial efforts to prevent it could be vital to improving the health and life course of VLBW infants.