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Pediatrics
Posted July 2014

Sharon Irving Discusses Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children

Sharon Y. Irving, PhD, RN, CRNP, Nurse Practitioner in the Critical Care division at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, had a recent paper, “Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children: Review of the Current Literature,” published in the June 2014 issue of Critical Care Nurse. The abstract states: Placement of a nasogastric enteral access device (NG-EAD), often referred to as a nasogastric tube, is common practice and largely in the domain of nursing care….This article presents the challenges of bedside NG-EAD plac...
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Study Results
Posted July 2014

Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children Nearly Doubled in Some Populations

​Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, Professor of Nursing of Children, and Assistant Dean for Community Engagement, recently presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions from June 13-17, 2014 in San Francisco. Her presentation centered on her ongoing analysis of the pediatric population in Philadelphia, and showed that the rate of type 1 diabetes is increasing, with some populations and age groups increasing greatly since the first cohort from 1985 to 1989....

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Awards
Posted July 2014

Penn Nursing Receives One of the First Future of Nursing Scholars Grants to Prepare PhD Nurses

​University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is one of only 14 schools of nursing nationwide to be among the first to receive a grant from a new Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) program to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. As an inaugural grantee of the Future of Nursing Scholars program, Penn Nursing will select two nursing students to receive financial support, mentoring, and leadership development over the three years of their PhD programs. The Future of Nursing Scholars progra...
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Pediatrics
Posted July 2014

Even Low Lead Levels Increase Child Emotional and Behavior Problems

​New research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics, indicates that low lead levels, even at concentrations lower than the previously defined Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) level of concern, are associated with increased child emotional and behavior problems. Until now, most studies have focused on the effect of lead on children’s IQ and their externalizing behavior. Lead is understood to lower children’s IQ at commonly encountered exposures and to increase aggressiveness and bullying. This study shows that even low lead levels in children are also associated with internalizing behavior problems and can help scientists better understand early heal...

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Study Results
Posted May 2014

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

​As outlined in a post on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation website, many nursing school officials are interested in increasing the diversity of their student bodies, but do the “pipeline programs” that aim to do that actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a new study by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Brooks Carthon is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Connections program...
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Other
Posted May 2014

Use of Transitional Care Model Broadened through UPstart Program

​The University of Pennsylvania UPstart Program announces TransCare Partners LLC to broaden the use of the Transitional Care Model developed at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. The Model, developed over 20 years by Mary Naylor, PhD, FAAN, RN, has been clinically proven to reduce hospital re-admissions by up to 30% while producing substantial savings for hospitals and Medicare. The model assigns an Advance Practice Nurse to follow the patient through the critical transition from hospital to home. An individual nurse can manage as many as 20 p...

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Study Results
Posted April 2014

California Schools Need More Support to Implement New Immunization Law

​Alison M. Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, Assistant Professor of Nursing in the Department of Family and Community Health at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, was recently published online in the journal Vaccine, the pre-eminent journal for those interested in vaccines and vaccination. Dr. Buttenheim's research, entitled “Ready or not? School preparedness for California's new personal beliefs exemption law,” co-authored with Marissa Wheeler, focuses on elementary school officials’ awareness of and preparedness for the implementation of California's new exemption law which prescribes stricter requirements for claiming a personal beliefs exemption from mandated school-entry immunizations and went into effect on January 1, ...
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Study Results
Posted February 2014

Better Nurse Staffing and Education Reduces Patient Deaths in European Hospitals

​The Lancet reported today the results of a study in 9 European countries documenting that hospital nurse staffing and the proportion of nurses with bachelor’s education are associated with significantly fewer deaths after common surgery. A team of researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in the U.S. and Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, found that every one patient increase in patient to nurse ratios was associated with a 7% increase in deaths, while having a better educated nurse workforce is associated with fewer deaths. Every 10% increase in bachelor’s degree nurses is associated with a 7% decline in mortality. ...

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