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Science in Action: All
Study Results
Posted April 2014

California Schools Need More Support to Implement New Immunization Law

​Alison M. Buttenheim, PhD, MBA, Assistant Professor of Nursing in the Department of Family and Community Health at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, was recently published online in the journal Vaccine, the pre-eminent journal for those interested in vaccines and vaccination. Dr. Buttenheim's research, entitled “Ready or not? School preparedness for California's new personal beliefs exemption law,” co-authored with Marissa Wheeler, focuses on elementary school officials’ awareness of and preparedness for the implementation of California's new exemption law which prescribes stricter requirements for claiming a personal beliefs exemption from mandated school-entry immunizations and went into effect on January 1, ...
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Study Results
Posted February 2014

Better Nurse Staffing and Education Reduces Patient Deaths in European Hospitals

​The Lancet reported today the results of a study in 9 European countries documenting that hospital nurse staffing and the proportion of nurses with bachelor’s education are associated with significantly fewer deaths after common surgery. A team of researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in the U.S. and Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, found that every one patient increase in patient to nurse ratios was associated with a 7% increase in deaths, while having a better educated nurse workforce is associated with fewer deaths. Every 10% increase in bachelor’s degree nurses is associated with a 7% decline in mortality. ...

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HIV/AIDS
Posted January 2014

Penn HIV Researchers Deploy Large-Scale Intervention Project in South Africa

A large-scale human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention/education effort aimed at helping South African men take a proactive role in the prevention of that disease has proven successful, an important development considering that country has the largest number of HIV infections in the world. Researchers, led by Prof. John B. Jemmott, III, Annenberg School for Communication and the Perelman School of Medicine; and Loretta Sweet Jemmott, Director of the Center for Health Equity Research at Penn Nursing,* developed an intervention involving nearly 1,200 individuals, who participated in customized and proactive...
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Cancer
Posted November 2013

Cancer Increasing as Baby Boomers Age

​As 10,000 baby boomers reach 65 each day, the incidence of cancer is increasing, estimated to increase by 67% between 2010 and 2030, bringing attention to the nation’s response to cancer care. Cancer is diagnosed at a higher rate, accounts for more survivors, and results in more deaths than in younger patients. “The increase in the number of older adults, the association of cancer with aging, the workforce shortage, and the financial stressors across the health care system and family networks all contribute to a crisis in cancer care that is most pronounced in the older population,” wrote three members of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population in an editorial published ...

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Study Results
Posted November 2013

Surviving Survival

​With advances in the treatment of childhood brain tumors, more children, some say up to 70 percent, survive and the numbers of caregivers have increased as have the demands placed upon them. Usually their caregivers are their mothers and other family members, especially for those survivors who do not gain independence in terms of their ability to live on their own, find work, make friends, and form partner relationships. In the largest study of its kind, researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing have investigated the caregivers of 186 mothers to childhood brain tumor survivors aged 14-40 whose care needs last long into adulthood. They based their research on a model containing factors central to nursing practice, namely the caregiver, the survivor, and the family. They discovered t...
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Other
Posted October 2013

Philadelphia Lagging Behind World Health Goals

​While widely known for spending the most dollars per capita on health care in the world, the United States is lagging behind World Health Organization’s (WHO) Millennium Development Goals (MDG) for women’s health and child mortality, with Philadelphia, the nation’s fifth largest city losing ground. According to new research gathered by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, infant mortality rates have been consistently higher than the U.S. and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2005, with African American infants falling within a 2-3 times greater risk of dying in their first year of life than any other racial or ethnic group within the city. The WHO has established eight MDGs, two of which directly impact health f...

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Other
Posted October 2013

Science Coalition Lauds RightCare Solutions

​The Science Coalition, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of more than 50 of the nation's leading public and private research universities, named RightCare Solutions in its new report, "Sparking Economic Growth 2.0." The report cited RightCare Solutions, a software program aimed at reducing readmissions within 90 days, thus reducing hospital costs as benefiting from the "university ecosystem." The report noted it "provides critical expertise, tools and infrastructure, as well as a creative environment that can help young companies thrive." The software emanated from independent research conducted at The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing by Kathryn H. Bowles, PhD, RN, FAAN, the van Amerigen Chair in Nursing Excellence and a professor of nursing. ...
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Hospital
Posted October 2013

Elderly African-American and Hispanic hospital patients suffer more complications than their white counter-parts

J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, RN, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar in the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, conducted an investigation that found elderly African-American and Hispanic hospital patients suffered greater numbers of complications even when corrected for confounding factors. “The risk of developing a post operative complication may be attributed to a number of factors,” lead study author Dr. Brooks Carthon said in the press release. “Most pronounced, however, was the effect of pre-existing medical conditions.” Researchers found that when hospital and patient characteristics were factored into the numbers, t...

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