Site ActionsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).Open Menu Navigate Up
Sign In
Penn Nursing > Science in Action
Science in Action: Recent
Pediatrics
Posted August 2014

Eileen Lake’s Research Discovers Causes for Outcome Disparities in VLBW Patients

​Research from Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, the Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Associate Professor of Nursing and Health Policy, Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, has determined that hospital-level disparities in very low birth weight (VLBW) infant outcomes are explained by poorer hospital nursing characteristics. This is the first study to both document that nursing characteristics vary across hospitals with high and low fractions of Black patients; and to demonstrate that nursing is an often unobserved hospital characteristic that contributes to institution-level disparities in a high-risk population. ...
Read More
Cancer
Posted August 2014

Salimah Meghani’s Research Uncovers Disparities and Provider Biases

​New research by Salimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor of Nursing, which investigated heuristics underlying cancer pain treatment decision-making for African Americans and whites, has uncovered disparities in that treatment and possible sources of these disparities. Her research has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and has received coverage from other medical media including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, ...

  Read More
Pediatrics
Posted August 2014

Diane Spatz's Research in Human Milk and Lactation Featured in Advances in Neonatal Care

​Diane L. Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, Professor of Perinatal Nursing, Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition and internationally known expert in the field of breastfeeding and human lactation, has authored and guest edited a collection of articles in Advances in Neonatal Care. Four of the articles were authored in collaboration with Penn Nursing alumni: "An Ethical Case for the Provision of Human Milk in the NICU," co-authored with alumna Elizabeth B. Froh, MS, RN, PhD(c), advocate...
Read More
Pediatrics
Posted July 2014

Sharon Irving Discusses Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children

Sharon Y. Irving, PhD, RN, CRNP, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Nursing and nurse practitioner in the Critical Care division at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, had a recent paper, “Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children: Review of the Current Literature,” published in the June 2014 issue of Critical Care Nurse. The abstract states: Placement of a nasogastric enteral access device (NG-EAD), often referred to as a nasogastric tube, is common practice and largely in the domain of nursing care….This article p...

  Read More
Study Results
Posted July 2014

Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children Nearly Doubled in Some Populations

​Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, Professor of Nursing of Children, and Assistant Dean for Community Engagement, recently presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions from June 13-17, 2014 in San Francisco. Her presentation centered on her ongoing analysis of the pediatric population in Philadelphia, and showed that the rate of type 1 diabetes is increasing, with some populations and age groups increasing greatly since the first cohort from 1985 to 1989....
Read More
Awards
Posted July 2014

Penn Nursing Receives One of the First Future of Nursing Scholars Grants to Prepare PhD Nurses

​University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is one of only 14 schools of nursing nationwide to be among the first to receive a grant from a new Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) program to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. As an inaugural grantee of the Future of Nursing Scholars program, Penn Nursing will select two nursing students to receive financial support, mentoring, and leadership development over the three years of their PhD programs. The Future of Nursing Scholars progra...

  Read More
Pediatrics
Posted July 2014

Even Low Lead Levels Increase Child Emotional and Behavior Problems

​New research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics, indicates that low lead levels, even at concentrations lower than the previously defined Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) level of concern, are associated with increased child emotional and behavior problems. Until now, most studies have focused on the effect of lead on children’s IQ and their externalizing behavior. Lead is understood to lower children’s IQ at commonly encountered exposures and to increase aggressiveness and bullying. This study shows that even low lead levels in children are also associated with internalizing behavior problems and can help scientists better understand early heal...
Read More
Study Results
Posted May 2014

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

​As outlined in a post on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation website, many nursing school officials are interested in increasing the diversity of their student bodies, but do the “pipeline programs” that aim to do that actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a new study by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Brooks Carthon is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Connections program...

  Read More