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Penn Nursing > Science in Action
Science in Action: Specialization Areas
Nutrition
Posted September 2012

You Have to Eat Except When You're Not Hungry

​When compared to their normal-weight siblings, overweight and obese children ate 34 percent more calories from snack foods even after eating a meal, reports a University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing researcher in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. That can be enough calories, if sustained over time, to continue excess weight gain.   In a study of 47 same-sex sibling pairs, the research showed that, even after eating a meal they enjoyed until they were full, overweight and obese children were more prone to overeating when presented with desirable snack foods than their normal-weight siblings.   ...
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Nutrition
Posted March 2012

Food Stamps and Farmers' Markets


​Current food stamp programs at urban farmers’ markets attempting to bring fresh produce to economically stressed city dwellers are so complicated for the shopper and expensive for the farmer that fewer people are taking advantage of the federal program designed to help them, according to research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.  Record numbers of Americans are receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, as food stamps are now known, and many SNAP participants live in neighborhoods with little or no access to healthy food. A study conducted at the Clark Park Farmers’ Market in Philadelphia, Pa., found that making it easier for vendors to collect SNAP payments with electronic point-of-sale systems increased fresh produce sales to SNAP recipients by 38 percent. However, the costs associated with ...

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Nutrition
Posted April 2011

Breakfast Reduces Lead Poisoning

It is known that fasting increases lead absorption in adults and consequently regular meals and snacks are recommended for children to prevent lead poisoning. New research published in BioMed Central’s open access journal Environmental Health demonstrates that having a regular breakfast is associated with lower blood lead levels in children. Data from the China Jintan Child Cohort Study compared blood lead levels to social factors, eating patterns and intake of micronutrients.  While there were no differences in breakfast patterns for age or gender of the child there were differences in blood lead levels. The risk of lead poisoning in boys was almost twice that of girls, and four and five year olds had twice the risk of lead poisoning than three year olds. Nevertheless, when variables, such as age and the gender of the child were taken into account, childre...
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Nutrition
Posted April 2009

Dr. Rogers receives R21 award to test whether extending sleep will facilitate weight loss in obese adults


Associate Professor of Nursing Ann E. Rogers, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been awarded an NIH R21 for her project, “Extending Sleep in Obese Adults to Promote Weight Loss.” It has been suggested--but never tested--that extending sleep will facilitate weight loss. Therefore, the goal is of this project is to lay the groundwork for a future clinical trial testing the hypothesis that healthy obese individuals who obtain at least 7.5 hours sleep per night will lose more weight than healthy obese adults obtaining 6.5 hours sleep per night.  ...

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Nutrition
Posted September 2008

NRSA Fellowship to Joanna Holsten

Joanna E. Holsten has received a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) for Individual Predoctoral Fellows in Nursing (F31) for her project, “The Food Environment and Body Mass Index in Middle School Children,”  under the mentorship of Dr. Charlene Compher.  The obesity epidemic is escalating unchecked, drastically effecting even our country’s youngest populations.  This cross-sectional study explores the relationship between children’s food environments and body mass index. Understanding this relationship will help direct future research and community interventions to address the epidemic....
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