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Penn Nursing > Science in Action
Science in Action: Specialization Areas
Hospital
Posted October 2013

Elderly African-American and Hispanic hospital patients suffer more complications than their white counter-parts

J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, RN, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar in the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, conducted an investigation that found elderly African-American and Hispanic hospital patients suffered greater numbers of complications even when corrected for confounding factors. “The risk of developing a post operative complication may be attributed to a number of factors,” lead study author Dr. Brooks Carthon said in the press release. “Most pronounced, however, was the effect of pre-existing medical conditions.” Researchers found that when hospital and patient characteristics were factored into the numbers, t...
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Hospital
Posted September 2013

Penn Nursing Software Featured as Innovation


With sequestration funding cuts affecting the research budgets of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), more emphasis is being placed on putting ongoing research into practice faster to provide greater benefit to the public health. United for Medical Research (UMR), a coalition of leading research institutions, patient and health advocates, and private industry that have joined together to seek steady increases in funding for the NIH has focused attention on research conducted at the School of Nursing that promises to cut costs for the nation’s hospitals and Medicare and Medicaid.RightCare Solutions, a software company spawned from research conducted by Kathryn H. Bowles, PhD, RN, FAAN, who holds the van Ameringen Chair in Nursing Excellence,  was recently highlighted in a UMR publicati...

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Hospital
Posted November 2012

Long Shifts Lead to Nurse Burnout and Dissatisfied Patients

Extended work shifts of twelve hours or longer are common and popular among hospital staff nurses, but a new study reports that nurses working longer shifts were more likely to experience burnout, job dissatisfaction, and patients were more dissatisfied with their care.   In the first study to examine the relationship between nurse shift length and patients’ assessment of care, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing report that nurses working shifts of ten hours or longer were up to two and a half times more likely than nurses working shorter shifts to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction. Furthermore, seven out of ten patient outcomes were significantly and adversely affected by the...
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Hospital
Posted June 2012

Unexpected Hazards of the Affordable Care Act


​One of the goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is to reduce the fragmentation of services for patients. The problems of fragmentation are magnified for the six million Americans receiving long-term services. New analysis, led by Mary D. Naylor, PhD, RN, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, examines the impact on this population of three provisions of the ACA—the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, the National Pilot Program on Payment Bundli...

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Hospital
Posted March 2009

Connie Ulrich appt. to NHLBI Board

Connie M. Ulrich, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Bioethics and Nursing, has been invited by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute at NIH to serve as the bioethicist for the NHLBI Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) for the Catheter Ablation versus Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation Trial. This is a major trial that has recently been funded by NIH and will involve approximately 3000 participants at 140 institutions.  Dr. Ulrich will serve with other scientists and will have responsibilities for assuring patient safety and the quality of the clinical study, including the benefits/risks of the proposed procedures and burden placed on the participants....
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Hospital
Posted December 2008

PVAMC award to Dr. Arlene Houldin


Arlene D. Houldin, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor of Psychosocial Oncology Nursing, was approved for funding from the Veterans Health Administration, Comprehensive End-of-Life Care Initiative through a competitive RFP process.  The purpose over 3 years is to establish a new palliative care/hospice unit at PVAMC, to support staffing, and to measure quality outcomes, including nurse-sensitive patient outcomes.  The proposal was submitted by Jen Kapo, Palliative Care Medical Director at the PVAMC, and Dr. Houldin as Palliative Care Nursing Director, with strong support and commitment from Cindy Heidt and the PVAMC administration.   The overall purpose of the funding is to ensure reliable access to quality end of life care to meet the needs of veterans with life limiting illness and their families, expanding the care of our veterans at PVAMC who are in ne...

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