Site ActionsUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).Open Menu Navigate Up
Sign In
Penn Nursing > Science in Action
Science in Action: Specialization Areas
Cancer
Posted August 2014

Salimah Meghani’s Research Uncovers Disparities and Provider Biases

​New research by Salimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor of Nursing, which investigated heuristics underlying cancer pain treatment decision-making for African Americans and whites, has uncovered disparities in that treatment and possible sources of these disparities. Her research has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and has received coverage from other medical media including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, ...
Read More
Cancer
Posted November 2013

Cancer Increasing as Baby Boomers Age


​As 10,000 baby boomers reach 65 each day, the incidence of cancer is increasing, estimated to increase by 67% between 2010 and 2030, bringing attention to the nation’s response to cancer care. Cancer is diagnosed at a higher rate, accounts for more survivors, and results in more deaths than in younger patients. “The increase in the number of older adults, the association of cancer with aging, the workforce shortage, and the financial stressors across the health care system and family networks all contribute to a crisis in cancer care that is most pronounced in the older population,” wrote three members of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population in an editorial published ...

  Read More
Cancer
Posted April 2012

Cancer and Clinical Trials

​In one of the first studies of its kind, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing researchers have identified what cancer patients consider the “benefits and burdens” of participating in clinical research trials. From their findings, the researchers developed a model of the five elements of decision-making (physical, psychological, economic, familial, and social) that patients with cancer use to determine whether to participate or remain in a clinical trial.   These findings can help researchers address factors leading to research participation and in ensuring voluntary, informed consent in clinical trials, explained lead author Connie M. Ulrich, PhD, RN, of Penn Nursing. “Clinical research is imperat...
Read More
Cancer
Posted June 2010

Life During and After Cancer


There seems hardly a facet of life after cancer and cancer screening that Dr. Deborah Bruner has not researched. Her work spans cancer related screening behaviors, decision-making related to screening and treatment, quality of life in prostate, gynecologic, brain, and head and neck cancers and gender differences in treatment outcomes.  She has been a pioneer in measuring the patient experience in cancer clinical trials.  One of her major studies has been on the reaction of spouses to prostate cancer screening and treatment.  Wives, she noted, tend to want doctors to take more aggressive options than their husbands do. Husbands, Dr. Bruner has found, initially say they want to preserve their quality of life, rather than extending their lives when interviewed alone; but when the husband hears th...

  Read More