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Penn Nursing Science

Care to change the world locally and globally

Penn Nursing is known for research leadership and quality that advances scientific knowledge across the healthcare spectrum. Collaborative efforts in our research centers – and across the University – result in discovery, development, and transmission of knowledge to impact and promote healthcare throughout the lifespan, increase disease prevention, enhance quality of life, eliminate health disparities, and develop the scientific knowledge that drives nursing practice.

“We need a better understanding of the potential benefits and harms, direct or indirect, for patients when nurses work with industry, and overall how industry relations affect public trust,” the authors wrote.

Our faculty are internationally renowned thought leaders representing the greatest minds in nursing research, education, and clinical practice.

Research produced here at the School of Nursing is recognized globally and helps to inform public health policy via articles published in a wide range of high-impact, peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journals.

Penn Nursing scientists advance healthcare

Penn Nursing research is conducted through school-supported and grant-funded research centers. Among colleges of nursing, Penn Nursing's world-renowned faculty collectively rank near the top of all schools of nursing receiving federal funding. Faculty and student research efforts are vigorously supported through the Office of Nursing Research, major research awards, and the University's significant research resources.

Penn Nursing Science in Action

Penn Nursing scientists translate and advance new nursing knowledge across an impressive range of healthcare areas, including: geriatrics, pediatrics, quality-of-life choices, nurse staffing, public policy, and much more. We invite you to explore Penn Nursing Science in Action!

  • Gender Differences and Relationship Power Could be Key in Preventing HIV Among South African Adolescents
    April 26, 2016
    ​University of Pennsylvania Study is the First Known to Examine Gender Differences in Intimate Partner Violence and Relationship Power Among Adolescents in South Africa Millions of those infected with HIV worldwide are young women, ages 15-24, according to the World Health Organization. Because the HIV epidemic overlaps with an epidemic of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women and girls, researchers have suspected a correlation between inequities in relationship power and the risky sexual behavior that can lead to HIV transmission. A new research study from the University of ...

  • Penn Nursing Study First to Show High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Large Population of Children with Type 1 Diabetes
    April 20, 2016
    ​During the past two decades, vitamin D status, defined as serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, has emerged as a predictor of key clinical outcomes including bone health, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, immune health and survival. Now, a University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) team, including senior author Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, Professor of Nursing of Children and Assistant Dean for Community Engagement, has examined the asso...

  • Missed Nursing Care May Contribute to Racial Disparities in Rehospitalizations after Heart Attack
    April 15, 2016
    ​The Penn Nursing Study is the First to Assess Whether Unmet Nursing Care Contributes to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Why are black older adults at higher risk of repeat hospital admission after a heart attack? Treatment at hospitals with higher rates of missed nursing care may be a contributing factor, reports a study in the May issue of Medical Care.   "Our findings suggest that unmet nursing care varies widely across US hospitals and ...