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Penn Nursing > Nursing Research
Can Breakfast Make Kids Smarter?

Penn Nursing Science

Care to change the world locally and globally

Penn Nursing is known for research leadership and quality that advances scientific knowledge across the healthcare spectrum. Collaborative efforts in our research centers – and across the University – result in discovery, development, and transmission of knowledge to impact and promote healthcare throughout the lifespan, increase disease prevention, enhance quality of life, eliminate health disparities, and develop the scientific knowledge that drives nursing practice.

“Our assumption was that the more obese children would be insensitive to sugar and therefore would need higher concentrations to get the same pleasing effect as leaner children,” said Paule Valery Joseph.

Our faculty are internationally renowned thought leaders representing the greatest minds in nursing research, education, and clinical practice.

Research produced here at the School of Nursing is recognized globally and helps to inform public health policy via articles published in a wide range of high-impact, peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journals.

Penn Nursing scientists advance healthcare

Penn Nursing research is conducted through school-supported and grant-funded research centers. Among colleges of nursing, Penn Nursing's world-renowned faculty collectively rank near the top of all schools of nursing receiving federal funding. Faculty and student research efforts are vigorously supported through the Office of Nursing Research, major research awards, and the University's significant research resources.

Penn Nursing Science in Action

Penn Nursing scientists translate and advance new nursing knowledge across an impressive range of healthcare areas, including: geriatrics, pediatrics, quality-of-life choices, nurse staffing, public policy, and much more. We invite you to explore Penn Nursing Science in Action!

  • Study from Penn Schools of Nursing & Medicine Offers New Approach to Treating Cocaine Addiction
    February 05, 2016
    ​In the ongoing fight against drug addiction, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing and Perelman School of Medicine have discovered a unique application for an FDA-approved drug currently used for obese patients and type 2 diabetics: treatment for cocaine dependence. The drug, trade name Byetta, derives from a naturally occurring hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1, or GLP-1, which regulates feeding behavior. Knowing what they did about GLP-1, ...

  • Whooping Cough Booster Vouchers Don’t Boost Immunization Rates of Caregivers
    February 03, 2016
    Cases of pertussis (whooping cough) have increased dramatically over the past five years, putting infants at risk of serious illness or death. Most infants are infected by a caregiver who has not received a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) booster, so caregiver immunization is particularly important.  However, many caregivers go unvaccinated, and new strategies are needed to convince those living with infants to get the Tdap booster. To address this care gap, a team of researchers lead by Alison Buttenheim PhD, MBA, an Assistant Professor of Nursing and an Assist...

  • Penn Nursing Study Answers: What’s a Good Breakfast for Kids?
    January 27, 2016
    ​A team of researchers, led by Tanja Kral, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, concluded that a breakfast high in protein – like eggs – keeps children fuller longer than cereal or oatmeal, causing them to eat fewer calories at lunch. The study, recently published in Eating Behaviors,...