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  • Diane Spatz’s Study Uncovers Need to Address Breastfeeding, Co-sleeping and Dental Health
    December 2014

    ​Co-sleeping — having an infant sleep close to or with his or her parent—is a common parenting choice, with the number of caregivers reporting this practice more than doubling since 1993, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. For those parents who co-sleep with their infants and breastfeed, breastfeeding is typically more frequent, leading to a repeated drop in the child’s mouth pH, potentially increasing the risk of dental caries. In a first-of-its-kind study to be published in The American...

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    Julie Fairman Co-convenes International Working Group Session on the Future of Nursing
    November 2014

    ​An international working group of nurses and health policy leaders has published a whitepaper, “The Future of Nursing,” which includes recommendations for transforming the field of nursing, in particular the role of Advanced Practices Nursing (APN), in order to ensure quality healthcare access to all. Julie Fairman, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Nightingale Professor of Nursing, and Director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, was a convener for the working group session that followed the 2014 ...

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    Barbra Mann Wall Publishes Editorial "Supporting the Ebola Nurses"
    November 2014

    ​In any disaster, history has shown that nurses and other healthcare workers need to feel that they can protect themselves and their families from illness, writes Penn Nursing Professor Barbra Mann Wall, PhD, RN, FAAN, in the journal Health Emergency and Disaster Nursing. Dr. Mann Wall, who serves as editor-in-chief of the journal, co-wrote the article with Dr. Arlene Keeling, PhD, RN, FAAN, an editorial board member with the journal. “Nurses from all over the world are taking acti...

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    Breastfeeding Medicine Publishes Research From Two Studies By Diane Spatz
    November 2014

    ​Until now, little has been published about employee lactation support in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. In an article to be published in Breastfeeding Medicine, Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, Professor of Perinatal Nursing and the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, details results of a study of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s (CHOP) comprehensive employee lactation program. The article, “Outcomes of a Hospital-Based Employee Lactation Program,” features findings from the largest survey of women in the United States workin...

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    Penn Nursing Researchers Inform Restraint-Free Elder Care Recommendations
    November 2014

    ​In the past, restraints were a ubiquitous healthcare practice by caregivers who wanted to protect elderly patients from falling or wandering or prevent them from dislodging or interfering with therapeutic devices. But research demonstrates that restraints for elderly patients actually do more harm than good, and caregivers are being asked to avoid their use entirely.  Leveraging the Choosing Wisely campaign – an initiative led by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) – the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) recently developed a list of "Five Thi...

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    Connie Ulrich Published in the British Medical Journal on Ebola and Moral Distress
    November 2014

    ​Hundreds of local healthcare workers have died in west African settings that lack the resources to deal with the Ebola outbreak, writes Connie M Ulrich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor of Nursing at Penn Nursing; and Associate Professor of Bioethics, Department of Medical Ethics, Penn School of Medicine "No one is talking about what must be profound moral distress among local African healthcare workers. Moral distress can result from not acting in accordance with what you believe to be ethically correct in professional practice, ...

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    Diane Spatz’s Article to Detail Pumping Initiation Project in CHOP’s Special Delivery Unit
    November 2014

    ​Human milk is infant food, but for sick, hospitalized babies, it’s also medicine. When a mother is not able to nurse her baby because the baby is born with complex congenital conditions, it is important for the mother to begin pumping her breasts within the first few hours after birth in order to provide a milk supply for her infant. In an article to be published in the Journal of Perinatal Education, Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, Professor of Perinatal Nursing and the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, and her students, Isabel Brewster and Kathy Houng...

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    Multidisciplinary Team Investigates a TCM for Persons with Serious Mental Illness
    October 2014

    The period following discharge from the hospital is a vulnerable time for patients. When hospital-to-home transitions are poorly handled, they result in hospital readmissions with an estimated annual cost of more than $40 billion, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. People with multiple and persistent mental and physical health problems have high rates of hospital transition failures. New research points to needed modifications in the transition care model that could effectively accommodate the intense psychosocial needs of those with serious mental illness. “Coordination of care during tra...

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    Janet Deatrick’s Research Shows Link to Central Role of Family in the Care of Survivors of Brain Tumors
    October 2014

    ​Approximately 26,000 children in the United States under age 19 are survivors of brain or central nervous system tumors. These adolescents and young adults, who have complex medical conditions, are often cared for by family members. These family caregivers operate as extensions of the healthcare system, yet a gap exists in understanding how these caregivers perceive their competence. In the largest study of its kind, researchers led by Janet A. Deatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Shearer Endowed Term Chair in Healthy Community Practices and Professor of Nursing at the University of Penn...

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    Dying in America: Dr. Meghani Serves on IOM Committee
    October 2014

    ​A new report released September 17, 2014 by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) identifies the need for greater understanding of the role of palliative care—by both the public and care professionals—as one of the nation’s greatest remaining challenges in the delivery of high-quality healthcare. Penn Nursing’s Salimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, RN, FAAN, an Associate Professor, served on the IOM committee that was formed to address key end of life issues.  ...

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    Better Nursing Resources for Critically Ill Babies Could Improve Health of 7 out of 10 Black Preemies
    September 2014

    ​In the first study of its kind about critically ill infants, a University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing  investigation shows that an insufficient number of nurses and poor work environments are associated with poorer health of infants born in hospitals that care for disproportionately many black infants. The research was published in the interdisciplinary journal Health Services Research. Lead author Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, is the Associate Dire...

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    Good Home Care by Nurses Prevents Hospital and Nursing Home Admissions
    September 2014

    ​I​n the largest study of its kind, a University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) investigation shows that home health agencies providing organizational support to their nurses get better outcomes.  The best outcomes for patients, including fewest hospitalizations and transfers to nursing homes, are achieved by home health agencies that provide supportive work environments, enabling nurses to focus on patient care.  The study, “...

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    Penn Nursing and the American Nurses Foundation announce launch of PTSD Toolkit
    August 2014

    ​The American Nurses Foundation announces the launch of PTSD Toolkit, developed in partnership with University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, in response to President Obama’s call to deliver quality health care to veterans. In conjunction with President Obama’s address to the American Legion’s 96th convention, the American Nurses Foundation (ANF), the philanthropic arm of the American Nurses Association (ANA), announced the launch of an interactive, web-based post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) toolkit that was developed in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), to help civ...

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    Eileen Lake’s Research Discovers Causes for Outcome Disparities in VLBW Patients
    August 2014

    ​​Research from Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, the Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Associate Professor of Nursing and Health Policy, Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, has determined that hospital-level disparities in very low birth weight (VLBW) infant outcomes are explained by poorer hospital nursing characteristics. This is the first study to both document that nursing characteristics v...

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    Salimah Meghani’s Research Uncovers Disparities and Provider Biases
    August 2014

    New research by Salimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor of Nursing, which investigated heuristics underlying cancer pain treatment decision-making for African Americans and whites, has uncovered disparities in that treatment and possible sources of these disparities. Her research has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and has received coverage from other medical media...

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    Diane Spatz's Research in Human Milk and Lactation Featured in Advances in Neonatal Care
    August 2014

    ​​Diane L. Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, Professor of Perinatal Nursing, Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition and internationally known expert in the field of breastfeeding and human lactation, has authored and guest edited a collection of articles in Advances in Neonatal Care. Four of the articles were authored in collaboration with Penn Nursing alumni: "...

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    Sharon Irving Discusses Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children
    July 2014

    ​Sharon Y. Irving, PhD, RN, CRNP, Nurse Practitioner in the Critical Care division at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, had a recent paper, “Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification in Children: Review of the Current Literature,” published in the June 2014 issue of Critical Care Nurse. The abstract states: Placement of a nasogastric ente...

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    Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children Nearly Doubled in Some Populations
    July 2014

    ​Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, Professor of Nursing of Children, and Assistant Dean for Community Engagement, recently presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions from June 13-17, 2014 in San Francisco. Her presentation centered on her ongoing...

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    Penn Nursing Receives One of the First Future of Nursing Scholars Grants to Prepare PhD Nurses
    July 2014

    ​University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is one of only 14 schools of nursing nationwide to be among the first to receive a grant from a new Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) program to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. As an inaugural grantee of the Future of Nursing Scholars program, Penn Nursing will select two nursing students to receive financial support, mentoring, and leadership development over the three years of their ...

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    Even Low Lead Levels Increase Child Emotional and Behavior Problems, Penn Nursing Study Finds
    July 2014

    ​New research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics, indicates that low lead levels, even at concentrations lower than the previously defined Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) level of concern, are associated with increased child emotional and behavior problems. Until now, most studies have focused on the effect of lead on children’s IQ and their externalizing behavior. Lead is understood to lower children’s IQ at commonly encountered e...

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