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Penn Nursing is at the forefront of research to prevent the spread of HIV and AIDS. From promoting awareness in traditionally underserved communities to exploring biological risks in heterosexual women, our students and faculty are taking the lead in preventative healthcare and the mission to find a cure.

Research:

Gender Equity: A Pathway to HIV Prevention Among South African Adolescents

Millions of those infected with HIV worldwide are young women, ages 15-24, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Because the HIV epidemic overlaps with an epidemic of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women and girls, researchers have suspected a correlation between inequities in relationship power and the risky sexual behavior that can lead to HIV transmission. Read more

People:

Anne M. Teitelman
Faculty

Anne M. Teitelman

Patricia Bleznak Silverstein and Howard A. Silverstein Endowed Term Chair in Global Women’s Health
José A. Bauermeister
Faculty

José A. Bauermeister

Presidential Associate Professor of Nursing
Bridgette M. Brawner
Faculty

Bridgette M. Brawner

Assistant Professor of Nursing
Amy Elizabeth Barrera-Cancedda
Students

Amy Elizabeth Barrera-Cancedda

Accelerated

News:

Understanding Connection Between HIV Transmission and Racial/ Ethnic and Geographical Differences Key to More Effective Interventions

The health effects of where people live, work, and interact are well documented, as are the value of neighborhood-level structural interventions designed to improve health. But place-based characteristics that contribute to disparities in HIV transmission and disease burden are poorly understood, possibly resulting in less-effective HIV risk reduction interventions and programming.

Relationship Found Between HIV Risk & Individual AND Community Level Educational Status

African-American men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at heightened risk for HIV infection and account for the largest number of African-Americans living with HIV/AIDS. It has long been understood that there is a clear and persistent association between poverty, transactional sex behavior, and HIV risk. A new University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) study has investigated how educational status relates to HIV risk in this population.