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Penn Nursing > Continuing Education > Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher

Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Lecture and Award

Recipient: Martha A. Q. Curley, PhD, RN, FAAN

Thursday, April 4, 2013
3:00-5:00 PM
Ann L. Roy Auditorium

This year's Fagin Award recipient is Dr. Martha A. Q. Curley, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Ellen and Robert Kapito Professor in Nursing Science. Dr. Curley is nationally and internationally renowned for her work related to clinical management of critically ill infants and children and their families, and also for her contributions to the field of pediatric critical care nursing.

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'Not for the Faint of Heart'

For more than twenty years, Dr. Curley’s research has focused on multi-site clinical trials to advance knowledge in the care of critically-ill pediatric patients, to develop instruments that could provide clinicians with better tools to assess patient status and risk, and to experiment with different interventions to support parental needs and priorities in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).  A major component of Dr. Curley’s research focuses on the interactions and crossing points between physicians and nurses who care for these critically ill children which is vital to improving health outcomes and in providing the needed support to families.

Advancing Care for Critically Ill Children

In addition to her outstanding funding and publishing record, Dr. Curley’s success is evidenced through her reputation for advancing the knowledge and improving the practice for critically ill pediatric patients and their families in such areas as patient positioning, eye care, endotracheal extubation, and sedation management. Her instruments, the Withdrawal Assessment Tool (WAT-l) and the Individualized Numeric Rating Scale for pain assessment constitute two of the three core comfort measures in pediatric critical care practice and research today, and her Braden Q scale for predicting pressure ulcer risk in pediatrics is used internationally. In addition, her work to study effects of parental presence during invasive procedures in critical care have resulted in policy changes in children's hospital and an award winning DVD entitled Training Parent Facilitators in 2009.

Clinicians and Parents: Working Together During Invasive Procedures
Penn Nursing Science in Action - November 27, 2012

New research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing reports that parents present during a child’s more invasive procedures reported higher levels of comfort, more procedural understanding and less emotional distress – while clinicians reported parent presence did not affect their technical performance, therapeutic decision-making, or ability to teach.

“Implementation of practice guidelines and an interprofessional educational initiative had a positive impact on helping clinicians to be better prepared, capable, and more deliberative when providing parents with more options during invasive procedures,” said Dr. Curley. “The intervention facilitated a cultural shift in the clinical practice of providing parental support during their children’s invasive procedures and resuscitation.”

 

 

 

Claire M. Fagin
PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Claire M. Fagin has devoted her career to nursing science, health care, health policy, and educational administration.
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Past Recipients

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2003
Mary D. Naylor
PhD, RN, FAAN

2004
Barbara Medoff-Cooper
PhD, CRNP, RN, FAAN

2005
Neville E. Strumpf
PhD, RN, FAAN

2006
Loretta Sweet Jemmott
PhD, RN, FAAN

2007
Linda H. Aiken
PhD, RN, FAAN, FRCN

2008
Marilyn S. Sommers
PhD, RN, FAAN

2009
Jennifer Pinto-Martin
PhD, MPH

2010
Julie Fairman
PhD, RN, FAAN

2011
Lois K. Evans
PhD, RN, FAAN

2012
Barbara J. Riegel
DNSc, RN, FAAN, FAHA